IMWAYR: Trying to keep the Pace

This week I’m trying to keep the pace by reading instead of watching the news. The USA is in turmoil. I’ve decided that if I keep reading, I can be more intelligent and then I’ll know how to respond more appropriately to the news. I’m hoping to improve my attitude. NetGalley Reading: I will start Red, White, and Whole by Rajani LaRocca tonight. A young Indian American girl shifts between worrying about school and taking care of her mother, who has leukemia. The book publishes in February, and I’m lucky to be approved to read this already-popular title. Physical Books: I read This is Your Brain on Stereotypes by Tanya Lloyd Kyi. It’s an upper elementary/middle school-appropriate nonfiction look at the science of your brain and how it makes you to think the way you do. It’s interesting and easy enough to read and understand for my students. I liked it! I also pulled Fault Lines in the Constitution by Cynthia Levinson and Sanford Levinson to read during this crazy real-life week. I received my copy of My Very Favorite Book in the Whole Wide World by Malcolm Mitchell, who gives children and adults a reason to smile about reading books. I saw the author speak at a virtual event with Brain Lair Books (My very favorite bookstore) and he was wonderful! I can’t wait to share this with my elementary students. Libro.fm Audiobooks: I’m still listening to the last 20% of Rent a Boyfriend by Gloria Chao. My priority is to get this one finished by tomorrow night.

It’s MONDAY! What are YOU reading?

IMWAYR is a weekly blog hop with kid lit co-hosts Jennifer from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers. The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It’s a great way to share what you’re reading and get recommendations from others. We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs each week.

IMWAYR: Nonfiction and Banned Books

There’s so much to read right now! Last week, I read a bunch of nonfiction picture books — I just LOVE picture books! I’m also celebrating Banned Books Week — Look for my “Banned Books Focus” posts this week.

I’m still reading Turning Point by Paula Chase (so good!) and I need to get to Vanderbeekers: Lost and Found by Karina Yan Glaser next!

It’s Hispanic Heritage Month, so I’m continuing to seek out those titles. Next up is Letters From Cuba by Ruth Behar (author of Lucky Broken Girl).

I’ve read some nonfiction books to pass along to my granddaughter when I see her. Voting, remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and studying climate change are topics of interest.

 

 

 

 

It’s Banned Books Week! Keep reading whatever you want to read, no matter the content, and don’t let anyone stop you. Censorship of any kind is wrong, and I’m happy to celebrate all reading this week.

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a weekly blog hop with kidlit co-hosts Jennifer (at www.teachmentortexts.com) and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers. The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

It’s a great way to share what you’re reading and get recommendations from others. We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Book Review: Tracking Pythons by Kate Messner

I recommended Tracking Pythons: The Quest to Catch an Invasive Predator and Save an Ecosystem to a student and I found that I loved it, too. I’m not a snake person, but this research trip that turned into an informative and interesting book for (older) children made me motivated to read more, as the back matter of the book suggests.

Author Kate Messner traveled to meet and travel with the team of scientists, including Ian Bartoszek, who were charged with tracking pythons and studying the ecosystems these gigantic snakes destroy. I learned how (NOT!) to catch a python, how much one python can eat as it grows to 15 feet long (!), and even something about responsible pet ownership of snakes. Many of the stories were humorous, such as Ian’s story of weighing one of the captured pythons at a supermarket’s scale (109 lbs!). Another scene included (gross!) pictures of a python who had eaten a deer. Back matter included “Invasive Species Most Wanted List” and a timeline of the Burmese pythons’ Florida invasion.

I was left in awe: “It’s always a mistake to underestimate the power of a Burmese python.”

This is an excellent nonfiction read for older elementary children or teens who need a mentor text for their own research projects.

IMWAYR: For the Students

I’m reading with the students this week. We are working on nonfiction texts during library time, and these titles are interesting and make us ask, “Really?” (“Really?” Strategy from Reading Nonfiction by Kylene Beers and Bob Probst. Good stuff!)

I liked this newest title from Lauren Wolk, too. Echo Mountain is coming out in April. I can’t wait for readers to meet Ellie and her family. Thank you, Dutton Children’s Books for providing the advanced readers copy.

Picture Books are Perfect! Looking forward to spring, I reread this awesome picture book by Phil Bildner. “Did you know?” The unique style — directly speaking to the reader — the author tells the story of tennis champs Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert and their amazing rivalry and friendship through many years of competition.

It’s Monday! What Are YOU Reading?

This meme is hosted by Kathryn at Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and Kathryn decided to give “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?” a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.