IMWAYR: Can’t Talk! Must Read!

With only one week until summer school, I’m reading like a bookworm! Here’s what’s up for this next week…

Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga (from last week’s list)

The Paris Project by Donna Gephart

Give and Take by Elly Swartz

Anthem by Deborah Wiles

(These three are publishing in October 2019. Preorder your copies now.)

 

 

My friends at #booksojourn passed these books to me. Do you think I can read all these in one week? I’m trying. I’m planning summer school experiences with inspiration from Kwame Alexander and Pam Allyn (and Monica Burns), too. Thanks for helping me out, friends!

It’s Monday! What are YOU reading?

 

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Kathryn at Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and I decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Book Review: Astro-Nuts, by Jon Scieszka

Recommended for ages 8-12, Astro-Nuts is the newest creation by Jon Scieszka , illustrated by Steven Weinberg. In this first book in a planned trilogy, Mission One: The Plant Planet, NNASA (Not-NASA) charges four mutant animals hiding in Mt. Rushmore to travel to outer space and find other planets to support human life, since the humans have all but destroyed planet Earth. (Science concept: Climate change) In their attempt to report Plant Planet as habitable, the Astro-Nuts found that the plant citizens are ready to defend their home.

As they navigate the crazy colorful pages, readers find out much more about the science of plant life, and also increase vocabulary skills, learning words like ice caps, fossil fuels, vortex, and many more. Reporting back to Earth isn’t as easy as it seems.

Would you like a funny book that also teaches science concepts, aimed to explain deep content to children? Well, Jon Scieszka does it again — creating zany characters who ban together for exploration and learning fun. Blast off! This adventure in reading has just begun. (Due September 2019 from Chronicle Books)

Book Review: Ordinary Hazards, by Nikki Grimes

Nikki Grimes is one of my favorite writers, gathering beautiful words in her notebooks over the years, which are now mixed with memories in Ordinary Hazards (coming 10/08/19 — thank you for providing ARCs, WordSong/Highlights).

The content is dark, yet hopeful. The words are tragic, yet inspirational. Some poems made me laugh (“Math Madness”) and more made me cry (“Reunion”). Ms. Grimes shares everything with the reader, making the reader feel her pain, believe in God, and hope for the future, all at once. The cover of the book reveals a beautiful, silvery sparkling butterfly; that’s Ms. Grimes — a cocooned child who emerges as a powerful and poetic, soulful adult.

“Words have the power to change a life, the power to save a life.” The last poem is the perfect, gripping ending to a heartfelt story of a human. Thank you, Ms. Grimes, for your words.

Book Review: The Tornado, by Jake Burt

        What does it take to avoid the school bully? Fifth grader and innovative thinker, Bell Kirby, has an elaborate plan that works, until the day Daelynn Gower, the new student with rainbow hair and crazy attire, arrives.
     Back in 4th grade, former friends, Bell and Parker Hellickson (the principal’s son), had a falling out over a hallway water fountain and a chipped tooth. After that incident, Parker became a diabolical bully and Bell became his favorite victim. In the present time, Bell created a notebook full of systems and solutions for every possible encounter, and was able to mostly avoid Parker (and Mr. Hellickson). Until now.
     When Daelynn becomes the new target, Bell must either step up and do something, or let it go and revel in the relief that Parker has finally decided to leave him alone. It seems like an easy choice, but it proves more difficult than Bell thought. Plus, Bell finds out during Creator Club that more kids have more stories to share about Parker and his “accidental antics.”
     The Tornado, by Jake Burt, is a book about bullying that is true-to-life, from the victim/bully mentality of kids all the way down to adults who say there is “zero tolerance,” but don’t act on their words. This book should be read aloud, discussed, and shared widely; it is important and timely. Put this book on your radar. Be prepared for this middle-grade must-read in October 2019.

IMWAYR: Just READ

As I plan for summer school, I’m trying to finish as much reading as I can before I don’t have time during the day to “just read.” This week…

I finished The Tornado by Jake Burt. Wow! If this story is fiction, then it’s as realistic fiction as a book gets. Look for my review soon. In the meantime, preorder the book, which will publish in October from Feiwel and Friends.

I’m finishing Ordinary Hazards, Nikki Grimes’ memoir, which is so beautiful I’m already reading it for the second time. Nikki writes, “Words have the power to change a life, the power to save a life.” I’ve never been so happy to know that is true. I’m grateful that Nikki decided to share her words with us. This one also comes out in October, and I’m already giving it 5 Stars. Get your hands on this one — preorder now. (from WordSong.)

I’m re-reading The Write Thing, by Kwame Alexander, as I plan for summer school writing workshop. We are going to have some fun!

I’m starting Astro-nuts by Jon Scieszka and Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga this week, too. 

 

 

 

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Kathryn at Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and I decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

NerdCampMI – another year of fabulous fun!

“What is Nerd Camp?” Wow! Fun-filled, exhausting days of learning, reading books, writing, meeting #kidlit authors in real life, reuniting with like-minded people, and visiting with fellow campers until the wee hours of the morning. #NerdCampJr was awesome this year, and those 3rd graders were amazing! THANK YOU to Alaina Sharp, Colby Sharp and family for hosting (again) the BEST summer PD EVER! Don’t forget, if you need books, order from Kathy at The Brain Lair Bookstore. One year with dreams of many more to come! I can’t tag everyone, or this post would be pages long, but please know that it was nice to see each and every one of you and I can’t wait until next year! ❤️

Happy Fourth of July! Book Review of Grace Goes to Washington

I’m so happy to live in a country where I am able to read and write. I’m celebrating the 4th with some books and my computer.

Today I read the upcoming Grace Goes to Washington, by Kelly DiPucchio. This title is due out September 3, 2019 from Disney-Hyperion and is another friendly and fun book about Grace and her adventures. (See also, Grace for President.)

As Grace’s class prepares for a field trip to Washington, DC, Mrs. Barrington prepares the children with a lesson about the three branches of government. She leads the learning about checks and balances, asking, “Who’s in charge here?” Later, while Grace and her fellow student council members work to decide how to spend the latest fundraiser money, they find correlations between their arguments and those of the government officials who run our country. With the help of a new friend, Grace can see that keeping an open mind to new perspectives and voting are ways to get things done.

The author gives children the chance to get involved in government, even if they are not old enough to vote yet. Read the Author’s Note and list of how to be an involved citizen. Kids and adults alike will love reading and sharing Grace Goes to Washington.

Happy Fourth of July!